Andhra Pradesh First a Celebration. Positive News, Facts & Achievements about Seemandhra, Coastal Andhra, Telugu People and all the People of Andhra Pradesh – here at Home and Overseas
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    November 22nd, 2017adminBusiness & Economy, Records, All, World Opinion
    In big league: P. Ashok Gajapathi Raju loading cargo onto a scanner at the international air cargo complex on Tuesday. | Photo Credit: C.V.Subrahmanyam

    In big league: P. Ashok Gajapathi Raju loading cargo onto a scanner at the international air cargo complex on Tuesday. | Photo Credit: C.V.Subrahmanyam

    We have achieved turnaround in the aviation sector, says Ashok Gajapathi Raju

    Union Civil Aviation Minister P. Ashok Gajapathi Raju on Tuesday said the Central government had reshaped the ecosystem to make the aviation sector in the country the third largest market in the world by bringing about a remarkable improvement in its ranking.

    Mr. Gajapathi Raju was speaking after inaugurating the international air cargo complex here in the presence of Visakhapatnam MP K. Haribabu, CEO and Executive Director of GSEC (O&M agency) Samir Mankad, CMD Rakesh Shah, Vice-Chairman and Managing Director of AP Trade Promotion Corporation (APTPC) M. Sadhu Sundar and Director of Visakhapatnam International Airport G. Prakash Reddy.

    “Before the NDA formed the government, it was ranked 13th from the bottom. During 70 years after Independence, only 71 airports had scheduled flights. We have created 80 airports in past three and a half years improving the connectivity,” he said. A long-awaited demand, the complex is spread over 674.64 square metres at the old terminal with facilities such as cold room for pharmaceutical and perishable products, strong room for valuable cargo, X-ray machine, explosive trace detector (ETD), CCTV cameras, material handling, and fire-fighting infrastructure. The complex is fully compliant with Customs as well as the Bureau of Civil Aviation Security.

    The facility is expected to give a boost to export of pharmaceuticals, seafood, garments and metallurgical products. Initially, the complex will handle five tonnes per day.

    The Minister said their focus was on improving rural connectivity and offering the luxury of flying from one place to another to all sections of society.

    Mr. Haribabu in his remarks recalled how the airport was developed in phases and mentioned that the work on six parking bays was almost complete and once they were open for night-time parking of aircraft, the operators could introduce late night and early morning flights to various destinations.

    source: http://www.thehindu.com / The Hindu / Home> News> States> Andhra Pradesh / by Special Correspondent / Visakhapatnam – November 22nd, 2017

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    SpaceANDHRA18nov2017

    Hyderabad :

    CANEUS International, involved in satellite and space technology has signed a tripartite agreement with the Andhra Pradesh Economic Development Board (APEDB) and the Andhra Pradesh State Skills Development Corporation (APSSDC) to establish a Center of Excellence on Space Sciences and Technologies for Development (CoE4SSTD) in Hindpur, Anantapur, Andhra Pradesh.

    This MoU was signed by Milind Pimprikar, Chairman, CANEUS and J Krishna Kishore, CEO, APEDB in the presence of Chief Guest Simonetta Di Pippo, Director, UNOOSA (United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs) an Italian astro-physicist with over 30 years of expertise in aerospace affairs and senior officials of ISRO in Bengaluru.

    The International Astronomical Union (IAU) had in fact named an asteroid 20887 “dipippo” after Pippo recognizing her contribution to space exploration.

    The CoE4SSTD is expected to help build capacities and capabilities in space science and research. Andhra Pradesh will partner, collaborate and assist the CoE4SSTD and help align the state with the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

    It will be developed over a 60 acres of land in Hindupur, and create opportunities for 500 highly skilled direct jobs and over 1000 indirect jobs in AP and will provide the much needed fillip for the aerospace and defense ecosystem in Anantapur. It is likely to be completed by the end of 2018. Anantapur has already seen Kia motors, BEL and other major investments

    CANEUS International, a non-profit organisation of professionals involved in public private partenrhsips in aeronautics, space and defence recently set up a facility for manufacturing small satellites in Nagpur.

    Krishna Kishore, CEO, APEDB said, “’Fostering such collaborations remains a key focus for Andhra Pradesh. This Centre of Excellence will also build deep industry-relevant capabilities and develop a pipeline of talent to support our growing aerospace industry and create an excellent ecosystem for turning Anantapur as a manufacturing hub.”

    Milind Pimprikar, Chairman, CANEUS said “This knowledge-intensive space industry is an exciting niche opportunity for Andhra Pradesh and the state has the potential to create valuable technology-based careers for those focusing on emerging technologies for solving problems while ushering in Industry 4.0.”

    source: http://www.thehindubusinessline.com / Business Line / Home> News> National / by M. Somasekhar / November 17th, 2017

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    November 12th, 2017adminAgriculture, Business & Economy, World Opinion
    Pirati Kanumuru with a wild crab at his pond near Konduru village in Krishna district.   | Photo Credit: T_ APPALA NAIDU

    Pirati Kanumuru with a wild crab at his pond near Konduru village in Krishna district. | Photo Credit: T_ APPALA NAIDU

    Reaping profits with export to China

    A young Hyderabad-based techie, Pirati Kanumuru, has tapped potential of mangrove crab (Scylla serrata) cultivation in the artificial ponds near Konduru mandal headquarters in Krishna district. Mr. Kanumuru was born in Konduru mandal.

    Managing to collect above 6,500 mangrove crabs from the Krishna Wildlife Sanctuary and other mangrove patches in Krishna and Guntur districts for every 90 days, the techie is reaping profits by exporting them to Singapore and China. The Yanadi tribal families collect the crab from the mangrove forest.

    Fattening technology

    “I have recently held talks with middlemen to export the wild crab to a few South Asian countries. The talks are in a crucial stage now,” Mr. Kanumuru told The Hindu. Beginning with a pilot project testing the survival and feasibility to cultivate the wild crab in the artificial ponds in 2015, Mr. Kanumuru had spread the wild crab cultivation in the six acres now.

    The growth of the wild crab being collected from the mangrove forest is fast. The crab would gain weight of up to two kilograms within the three months in the crab fattening technology. In the fattening technology, the crab is left to grow in the floating cage.

    “In the international market, a kilogram live crab fetches ₹1,000 to ₹1,200. The profit on each crab for each cultivation season (three-months) is clearly double in the existing market prices,” added Mr. Kanumuru. The techie had installed Closed Circuit cameras covering all the ponds here, inspecting the groundwork and day-to-day developments through online from Hyderabad. The crab fattening technology enables to go for any inter-crop in the same pond as the cages with crab are required to float on the pond. “The existing United Nation’s guidelines will not encourage the mass collection of the wild crab (Scylla serrata) from the mangrove crab, citing a threat to the brackishwater species. There is a need to develop hatcheries to encourage the crab cultivation,” said Mr. Kanumuru.

    Hatchery in Bapatla

    The State government with the support of the Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Aquaculture has proposed to set up a wild crab hatchery in Bapatla in Guntur district. In 2014, the Central Institute of Brackishwater Aquaculture, Chennai, has introduced the crab fattening technology in Sorlagondi forest in Krishna district, involving the Yanadi tribal families those engaged in the collection of the wild crab from the mangrove cover.

    source: http://www.thehindu.com / The Hindu / Home> News> States> Andhra Pradesh / by T. Appala Naidu / Koduru (Krishna) , October 30th, 2017

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    October 31st, 2017adminAgriculture, Business & Economy, World Opinion

    Officials say the farmers are expected to learn from Singapore how to invest the funds they have earned in exchange for their land, “so that Amravati can become another Singapore”.

    The first batch of farmers left this morning for the airport in a bus flagged off by CM Naidu.

    Hyderabad :

    Cash-strapped Andhra Pradesh is sending over 100 farmers to Singapore so they can see how the land bought from them will be used for the development of new capital Amravati, and also how they can invest their new-found wealth.

    These are farmers who signed off their land to the Capital Region Development Authority for the building of Amravati after Andhra Pradesh lost Hyderabad to new state Telangana after bifurcation. Around 26,000 farmers gave up around 33,000 acres of land.

    Sources say the government, in partnership with Singapore, has put up Rs. 40 lakh for the tour plan, hotels and food while the farmers, wealthier after being compensated for their land, are paying for the ticket.

    The first batch of 34 farmers, selected through a draw of lots, left this morning for the airport in a bus flagged off by Chief Minister Chandrababu Naidu. “These farmers have created a world record by making a success of land pooling. They should learn how Singapore has developed and their best practices,” Mr Naidu said.

    There will be four batches and a total of 123 farmers will tour Singapore. Many have never gone abroad and were full of doubts.

    K Adilakshmi from Tullur, who had given five acres of land, said she is happy that farmers are being made partners in the region that originally belonged to them. “I am sure we will learn a lot from Singapore,” she said.

    Officials say the farmers are expected to learn from Singapore how to invest the funds they have earned in exchange for their land, “so that Amravati can become another Singapore”.

    Critics say while thousands of farmers gave up their land, only those seen to be close to the ruling party were shortlisted for the foreign trip.

    A consortium of Singapore firms, Surbana Jurong, is the lead consultant for building Amravati in 20 years at a cost of Rs. 55,000 crore.

    The farmers’ group is expected to visit Singapore’s Centre for Liveable Cities and the Singapore Art Museum. There will also be a session on construction laws for apartments.

    source: http://www.ndtv.com / NDTV / Home> Andhra Pradesh> Sections / by Uma Sudhir / October 31st, 2017

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    There are only about 56 families engaged in the craft at Kondapalli at present, and only five families that make the iconic bullock cart.

    A Kondapalli bullock cart.

    A Kondapalli bullock cart.

    Kondapalli Bommalu, the traditional craft of making wooden figurines and toys in Kondapalli of Krishna district of Andhra Pradesh, is set for a makeover.

    The brightly coloured miniature bullock cart, which is usually gifted by Andhra Pradesh CMs and government officials to visiting dignitaries and foreign guests, will now be a “moving” one. The state government has called for designs from artisans of the small community that makes these handicrafts to develop a “moving” Kondapalli bullock cart, General Administration Secretary N Srikant said. The government has also announced a reward of Rs 2 lakh for the winning design.

    Officials said that given the tough competition from cheaper Chinese toys, declining popularity of motionless toys, and shrinking number of families involved in Kondapalli Bommalu, the state government has decided to preserve this craft and save the artisans from penury by asking them to redesign models and make them more marketable.

    Kondapalli toys are made by a community of artisans with centuries-old techniques. Their ancestors migrated from Rajasthan over 400 years ago and settled at Kondapalli, 40 km from Vijayawada, where they used soft white sandalwood from nearby forests to make the figurines.

    There are only about 56 families engaged in the craft at Kondapalli at present, and only five families that make the iconic bullock cart. Five other families make the dancing doll, originally called Thanjavur Doll.

    source: http://www.indianexpress.com / The Indian Express / Home> India / by Express News Service / Hyderabad – October 24th, 2017

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    October 21st, 2017adminBusiness & Economy, Science & Technology
    CEO of AP Innovation Society Valli Kumari Vatsavayi

    CEO of AP Innovation Society Valli Kumari Vatsavayi

    Soft launch in January, says innovation society CEO

    After starting its office at the Sunrise Incubation Hub here recently for its ambitious unit, the AP Innovation Society is planning to roll out the first drone manufactured in the State from New Year.

    “We have decided to undertake a soft launch in January as a prelude to the commercial launch in March,” APIS CEO Valli Kumari Vatsavayi told The Hindu on Wednesday. She said there was tremendous response to the drone manufacturing facility being developed in the city with patronage from the State government.

    An investment of ₹1 crore would be made in the project during the first year of operation. The centre will produce drones costing ₹1 lakh depending on its configuration like lens, accessories and range of its operation.

    Price advantage

    Ms. Valli Kumari said they would manufacture 25 drones per month from March once the facility turned fully operational. “The drones produced here under the Make in Andhra Pradesh programme will cost less than the private manufacturers. We can make a normal drone for ₹1 lakh which costs ₹4 lakh to ₹5 lakh if sourced from a private manufacturer,” she said. As part of its resolve to promote innovation culture among youngsters, they would also have a R&D lab and reverse engineering lab. The prototypes would be put to commercial use through research by startups and innovators at the facility started at the Sunrise Incubation Hub.

    Network of mentors

    A network of mentors, including IITs and foreign institutes, had been developed to partner in the project. The government would procure the drones for land registry, soil mapping, police surveillance through various departments, she said.

    source: http://www.thehindu.com / The Hindu / Home> News> States> Andhra Pradesh / by Santosh Patnaik / Visakhapatnam – October 19th, 2017

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    M.S.R. Murty showing the VIP robes ahead of the AU convocation, in Visakhapatnam on Wednesday. | Photo Credit: K_R_DEEPAK

    M.S.R. Murty showing the VIP robes ahead of the AU convocation, in Visakhapatnam on Wednesday. | Photo Credit: K_R_DEEPAK

    The octogenarian has been supplying the special garment since 1959

    Year after year, M.S.R. Murty has been an integral part of the jubilation of scores of graduates who pass out on the convocation day wearing black ceremonial robes, flinging their black scholars’ hats into the air.

    Since 1959, the 80-year-old has been supplying the black gowns for the convocation of the Andhra University and 50 other colleges in the districts of Visakhapatnam, Vizianagaram and Srikakulam.

    Celebrity customers

    From former President Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan and former Prime Minister Indira Gandhi to actors like ANR and Bhanumathi to former cricketer Sunil Gavaskar, several important personalities have worn the gowns made by Mr. Murty, a known name in the university and college circles of the city.

    Ahead of the 83rd and 84th combined convocation of the University, the octogenarian is filled with nostalgia as he goes down the memory lane to share some priceless moments.

    “In those days, AU convocation used to be a big affair and meticulously held every year on the second Saturday of December. We had a tailoring unit at our book store in the One Town area, where the black gown with golden border used to be stitched,” says Mr. Murty, who took over his father’s business in 1959. Till about a decade ago, the gowns used to be stitched at the tailoring unit in the city. However, a dwindling interest in tailoring business made it difficult for him to get the work done by local tailors.

    He now gets the gowns made from a Chennai-based unit. This year, he is supplying as many as 1,100 gowns for the convocation.

    The first film celebrity to don his gown was ANR when he was conferred the honorary doctorate degree of ‘Kalaprapoorna’ by the AU in the 70s. Later, it was during Indira Gandhi’s visit the tradition of the ceremonial gown was changed to silk scarves.

    “That particular year, I was ready with gowns when hardly 20 days ahead of the convocation I was informed about the change. I had to rush to Mumbai to get the silk cloth for the scarves and managed to make 100 scarves in a span of a week’s time. Ms. Gandhi was very particular about protocol and there were elaborate arrangements and practice done to avoid any chance of even minor goof-ups. I made a special velvet scarf for Ms. Gandhi for the convocation where she was conferred D. Litt. ,” recollects Mr. Murty.

    Age has certainly not withered him as he gets ready for Saturday’s convocation with two separate sets of gowns – the black ones for the graduates and the coloured ones for VIPs.

    “The gowns are given on rent for ₹150 and I charge a caution deposit of ₹1,000 from each student, which is refunded once the gowns are returned,” says Mr. Murty, who also supplies gowns for convocation of other colleges and universities like GITAM University and Damodaram Sanjivayya National Law University.

    With his children settled in their respective careers, Mr. Murty continues his family business with diligence in his twilight years.

    source: http://www.thehindu.com / The Hindu / Home> News> States> Andhra Pradesh / by Nivedita Ganguly  / Visakhapatnam – July 27th, 2017

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    July 28th, 2017adminBusiness & Economy
    IT Advisor J.A. Chowdary (second from left) and CEO of Capgemini K . Srinivas (third from left) releasing a book. | Photo Credit: Special Arangement

    IT Advisor J.A. Chowdary (second from left) and CEO of Capgemini K . Srinivas (third from left) releasing a book. | Photo Credit: Special Arangement

    $1 billion challenge contest soon

    Special Chief Secretary and IT Adviser to the Chief Minister J.A. Chowdary on Thursday said the State government was keen on developing Visakhapatnam as a hub for blockchain technology, in its bid to overcome challenges posed by reverse globalisation and disruptive technologies.

    He was addressing a conference on ‘Skill India – the way forward: Challenges and imperatives’ organised by GITAM University.

    Mr. Chowdary said AP Electronics and IT Agency (APEITA), an autonomous institute formed by the government, had tied up with GITAM University and Broadridge of the United States to introduce job-ready courses in blockchain technology.

    He said J.C. Bose Institute of Cryptology would set up a centre in Visakhapatnam.

    Stating that Visakhapatnam was being promoted as a Fintech Valley, he said they would organise a $1 billion blockchain challenge contest in the city sometime in October, to bring companies specialising in blockchain here and the best selected would be provided with the space to start their operations.

    He said the spectre of jobless growth was haunting the country and therefore the Andhra Pradesh Government was promoting IT technologies, such as blockchain tech, cyber security and analytics to tap huge job potential.

    Capgemini India CEO Srinivas Kandula complimented the State government for its bold initiative in promoting new age technologies.

    Skill gap

    Calling for recasting the curriculum by the educational institutes to roll out industry-ready professionals Mr. Srinivas pointed out that most of the engineering graduates in the country did not have the requisite skills and the companieswere being forced to impart training on them.

    GITAM University Pro Vice-Chancellor K. Siva Rama Krishna and principal of GITAM Institute of Management P. Sheela spoke.

    source: http://www.thehindu.com / The Hindu / Home> News> States> Andhra Pradesh / by Special Correspondent / Visakhapatnam – July 28th, 2017

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    It is a first of its kind in the world, says CMFRI scientist

    Redefining mariculture: Seed of Indian pompano at the CMFRI nursery in Visakhapatnam. | Photo Credit: arranged

    Redefining mariculture: Seed of Indian pompano at the CMFRI nursery in Visakhapatnam. | Photo Credit: arranged

    The regional centre of ICAR-Central Marine Fisheries Research Institute here has made a major breakthrough by undertaking mass scale seed production of Indian pompano for the first time in the world.

    Indian pompano (trachinotus mookalee) is a marine fish belonging to the family Carangidae. It is low in landing from the wild. It contains Omega 3 and 6 fatty acids. It is sold in the domestic market at ₹200 to ₹300 per kg.

    The species is distributed in the Indo-West Pacific region and present in 15 countries of the Asian continent. In India, it is reported from both the west and east coasts.

    It has sporadic occurrences in bays and lagoons, and the adult fish prefers shallow coastal waters with rocky areas.

    Senior scientist in charge of the regional centre Subhadeep Ghosh told The Hindu that the fish was considered to be a good candidate species for aquaculture due to its fast growth rate, easy adaptability to culture conditions, quick acceptance of artificial feed, pleasant appearance, good meat quality, and high consumer preference. In addition, it can be successfully cultured in tanks, ponds and cages.

    Broodstock collection

    In a bid to diversify Indian mariculture, breeding and seed production of the species was initiated at the regional centre with broodstock collection in 2011.

    Initial success in seed production on a small scale was achieved in early 2014. However, seed could not be produced consistently due to loss of broodstock maintained in the cage by the effect of the catastrophic Hudhud cyclone that hit the Visakhapatnam coast that year.

    Broodstock collection was initiated again in 2015 and the fishes were stocked in the land-based Re-circulating Aquaculture System (RAS) for development and maturation.

    “With manipulation of water quality and feeding protocols, fishes were induced to spawn in the RAS and mass scale seed production was achieved in early 2017,” Dr. Ghosh said.

    Metamorphosis from larvae to fry started on the 17th day post-hatch and was completed by the 22nd day. After 30 days of rearing, the survival rate was around 17.2% and the fry reached an average size of 2.9 cm in length and 1.27 gm in weight. A few thousand fry were transferred to the Veraval Regional Centre of CMFRI in Gujarat and are being nursery-reared for stocking in cages.

    Another few thousand fry were transferred to Nagayalanka in Krishna district of Andhra Pradesh and are being nursed prior to release in the pond. The remaining fry, again a few thousands, are being nursery-reared at the Visakhapatnam Regional Centre of CMFRI.

    He said the seed would be stocked in open sea floating cages for grow-out very soon.

    This was the first case of successful mass scale seed production of Indian pompano under confinement anywhere in the world.

    The success raised hopes for culture of the fish using hatchery produced seed in India and will present enormous scope for aquaculture business opportunity in the near future for Indian fish farmers through species diversification.

    source: http://www.thehindu.com / The Hindu / Home> News> Cities> Visakhapatnam / by Santosh Patnaik / Visakhapatnam – July 04th, 2017

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    The Andhra Pradesh government is the registered proprietor of the GI tag for mangoes, often hailed as “the king of fruits.” Photo: | Photo Credit: C.V. Subrahmanyam.

    The Andhra Pradesh government is the registered proprietor of the GI tag for mangoes, often hailed as “the king of fruits.” Photo: | Photo Credit: C.V. Subrahmanyam.

    Banganapalle mangoes have been grown for over 100 years in Andhra Pradesh.

    The succulent Banganapalle mango has received a Geographical Indication (GI) tag, making Andhra Pradesh the proprietor of the variety known for its sweetness.

    The Registrar of Geographical Indications Registry, Chennai, O.P. Gupta has accorded the registration following an application from the Horticulture Commissioner, Andhra Pradesh.

    The Andhra Pradesh government is the registered proprietor of the GI tag for mangoes, often hailed as “the king of fruits.”

    A GI tag indicates that the product comes from a specific region.

    Banganapalle mangoes have been grown for over 100 years in the State. It also known as Beneshan, Baneshan, Benishan, Chappatai and Safeda.

    Besides, they are also called Banaganapalli, Banginapalli, Banaganapalle.

    The fruits can retain their quality under cold storage even up to three months, Andhra Pradesh government said in documents seeking GI.

    “The prominent characteristic of Banganapalle mangoes is that their skin has very light spots, stone is oblong in shape and has very thin seed with sparse and soft fibre all over,” it said.

    The primary centre of origin of the fruit is Kurnool district comprising Banaganapalle, Paanyam and Nandyal mandals, according to the Andhra Pradesh government which mentioned Rayalaseema and coastal Andhra as secondary centres of origin.

    The government has also listed Khammam, Mahabubnagar, Rangareddy, Medak and Adilabad districts in Telangana as secondary centres of origin.

    Submitting documents for proof of origin, it also cited historical records like a “war fund seal (Banganapally-State Madras War Fund Seal).”

    A logo too is in place — featuring a bright yellow fruit around which the tagline says “Banganappalle Mangoes of Andhra Pradesh,” with images of a man and a woman appearing to be farmers.

    According to an affidavit furnished in 2011 by the then Andhra Pradesh Commissioner of Horticulture, I. Rani Kumudini, nearly 7.68 lakh families were involved in the production of Banaganapalle mangoes.

    About 5,500 tonnes of Banganappalle mangoes were being exported annually to countries like the U.S. and U.K.

    While the annual turnover of Banaganapalle mangoes was approximately ₹461 crore, exports were to the tune of ₹20.68 crore, she had said.

    GI is covered under the Intellectual Property Rights and the Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights.

    A GI tag certifies the origin of a product or produce from a particular region as the quality or other features of the product is attributable only to the place of its origin.

    The tag helps farmers or manufacturers, as the case may be, to get a better price in the market.

    source: http://www.thehindu.com / The Hindu / Home> Sci-Tech> Agriculture / PTI / Chennai – May 04th, 2017

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