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    September 19th, 2017adminArts, Culture & Entertainment, Records, All
    Carnatic vocalist Dwaram Lakshmi receiving the M.S. Subbulakshmi memorial award from K.S. Govindarajan, principal, Government College of Music and Dance, and ZP chairperson Gadde Anuradha, at a function in Vijayawada on Saturday. | Photo Credit: ARRANGED

    Carnatic vocalist Dwaram Lakshmi receiving the M.S. Subbulakshmi memorial award from K.S. Govindarajan, principal, Government College of Music and Dance, and ZP chairperson Gadde Anuradha, at a function in Vijayawada on Saturday. | Photo Credit: ARRANGED

    She has evolved a distinctive style of her own

    The prestigious music award named after Carnatic vocal doyen M.S. Subbulakshmi was given to vocalist Dwaram Lakshmi at a function organised by the Department of Language and Culture at the Ghantasala Government Music College here on Saturday.

    Ms. Lakshmi is a Doctorate in Music and is working as a Grade ‘A’ artist with the All India Radio and Doordarshan. She is proficient in Carnatic Classical and Light Music (Sugam Sangeeth). She is the grand daughter of the legendary violinist Dwaram Venkata Swamy Naidu. She is a third generation musician with both her parents being musicians. Her father Dwaram Bhavanarayana Rao and mother Venkata Varadamma are also legends with many admirers. She is also a pupil of stalwarts like MS Vasantha Kumari, T.R. Subrahmanyam, Pemmaraju Surya Rao and learnt Hindustani from J.V.S. Rao. She has evolved a distinctive style of her own.

    Violin maestro Annavarapu Ramaswamy and Krishna district Zilla Parishad chairperson Gadde Anuradha presented the award to Ms. lakshmi.

    source: http://www.thehindu.com / The Hindu / Home> News> States> Andhra Pradesh / by Special Correspondent / Vijayawada – September 16th, 2017

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    M.S.R. Murty showing the VIP robes ahead of the AU convocation, in Visakhapatnam on Wednesday. | Photo Credit: K_R_DEEPAK

    M.S.R. Murty showing the VIP robes ahead of the AU convocation, in Visakhapatnam on Wednesday. | Photo Credit: K_R_DEEPAK

    The octogenarian has been supplying the special garment since 1959

    Year after year, M.S.R. Murty has been an integral part of the jubilation of scores of graduates who pass out on the convocation day wearing black ceremonial robes, flinging their black scholars’ hats into the air.

    Since 1959, the 80-year-old has been supplying the black gowns for the convocation of the Andhra University and 50 other colleges in the districts of Visakhapatnam, Vizianagaram and Srikakulam.

    Celebrity customers

    From former President Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan and former Prime Minister Indira Gandhi to actors like ANR and Bhanumathi to former cricketer Sunil Gavaskar, several important personalities have worn the gowns made by Mr. Murty, a known name in the university and college circles of the city.

    Ahead of the 83rd and 84th combined convocation of the University, the octogenarian is filled with nostalgia as he goes down the memory lane to share some priceless moments.

    “In those days, AU convocation used to be a big affair and meticulously held every year on the second Saturday of December. We had a tailoring unit at our book store in the One Town area, where the black gown with golden border used to be stitched,” says Mr. Murty, who took over his father’s business in 1959. Till about a decade ago, the gowns used to be stitched at the tailoring unit in the city. However, a dwindling interest in tailoring business made it difficult for him to get the work done by local tailors.

    He now gets the gowns made from a Chennai-based unit. This year, he is supplying as many as 1,100 gowns for the convocation.

    The first film celebrity to don his gown was ANR when he was conferred the honorary doctorate degree of ‘Kalaprapoorna’ by the AU in the 70s. Later, it was during Indira Gandhi’s visit the tradition of the ceremonial gown was changed to silk scarves.

    “That particular year, I was ready with gowns when hardly 20 days ahead of the convocation I was informed about the change. I had to rush to Mumbai to get the silk cloth for the scarves and managed to make 100 scarves in a span of a week’s time. Ms. Gandhi was very particular about protocol and there were elaborate arrangements and practice done to avoid any chance of even minor goof-ups. I made a special velvet scarf for Ms. Gandhi for the convocation where she was conferred D. Litt. ,” recollects Mr. Murty.

    Age has certainly not withered him as he gets ready for Saturday’s convocation with two separate sets of gowns – the black ones for the graduates and the coloured ones for VIPs.

    “The gowns are given on rent for ₹150 and I charge a caution deposit of ₹1,000 from each student, which is refunded once the gowns are returned,” says Mr. Murty, who also supplies gowns for convocation of other colleges and universities like GITAM University and Damodaram Sanjivayya National Law University.

    With his children settled in their respective careers, Mr. Murty continues his family business with diligence in his twilight years.

    source: http://www.thehindu.com / The Hindu / Home> News> States> Andhra Pradesh / by Nivedita Ganguly  / Visakhapatnam – July 27th, 2017

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    Traces of the past: A World War II pill box resurfaces in Visakhapatnam. | Photo Credit: K_R_DEEPAK;K_R_DEEPAK -

    Traces of the past: A World War II pill box resurfaces in Visakhapatnam. | Photo Credit: K_R_DEEPAK;K_R_DEEPAK –

    They should be restored and turned into museums, say historians

    A silent reminder of a significant chapter of Visakhapatnam’s maritime history, the World War – II pill boxes or bunkers dotting the shores of the coast, resurfaces every year during monsoon when the eroded sands uncover these concrete structures hidden beneath for decades.

    Lack of any effort to restore and conserve these historical concrete fortifications, vagaries of nature over the years and public apathy have left these pill boxes in a state of utter neglect, serving as a painful reminder of an earlier time, slowly crumbling back into the sea.

    Maritime history

    At a time when the Tourism Department in association with the district administration is making efforts to create a maritime museum circuit along the beach road, these vintage pill boxes cry for attention. According to historians and retired naval personnel, these pill boxes are a significant link to the maritime history of the region, which should be restored and included in the maritime historical circuit at the Beach Road where the latest addition is the upcoming museum project of the decommissioned TU 142 fighter aircraft.

    Speaking to The Hindu, (Retd.) Cdr B.L.N. Rao, secretary of Navy Foundation – Visakhapatnam Chapter, said: “There are four such pill boxes spotted along the Vizag coast. The one at R.K. Beach is still in good shape and can easily be retrieved. Once it resurfaces from the sand, iron sheets can be kept all around it, the remaining sand can be dug till the base of the structure and with the help of hydraulic jack it can be lifted and shifted.”

    Last year, Cdr. Rao had initiated efforts in the restoration of these critical historical pill boxes by taking the VUDA officials around the locations where they are seen. “Nothing much has been done after that,” he said.

    The pill box at the R.K. Beach is about 20 to 30 feet wide and 10 feet high. “Similar dimensions of pill boxes exist near Kotaveedhi and Lavender Canal. However, the one near the fishing colony of Jalaripeta is nearly four times the size of the others and is beyond repair. That one was used as the command control centre by the British,” he added.

    As conflict in the World War II ramped up, these pill boxes were used to fortify the shores by the British to resist invasion by Japan. According to researchers, most of them were constructed around 1938-1941.

    Old timers recollect the presence of another pill box opposite the Naval Coastal Battery which they say was “mercilessly razed to the ground” in the 1960s when the road was being built. “These defence constructions were considered to be highly confidential during WW-II. Hence, there is no proper documentation of the number of bunkers present along the Vizag coast,” said historian Edward Paul.

    But recently these secret bunkers have piqued the interest of historians, war veterans and enthusiasts alike – and more people are attempting to discover their locations.

    “Proper signage at the locations of the pill boxes can go a long way in showcasing the maritime history of the region,” Mr. Paul added. While efforts to restore a similar British-era bunker discovered inside the Raj Bhavan in Mumbai are being taken, in other parts of the world – the most recent one being in Denmark’s western coast, World War II bunkers have been transformed into museums.

    source: http://www.thehindu.com / The Hindu / Home> News> States > Andhra Pradesh / by Nivedita Ganguly / July 24th, 2017

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    It is a first of its kind in the world, says CMFRI scientist

    Redefining mariculture: Seed of Indian pompano at the CMFRI nursery in Visakhapatnam. | Photo Credit: arranged

    Redefining mariculture: Seed of Indian pompano at the CMFRI nursery in Visakhapatnam. | Photo Credit: arranged

    The regional centre of ICAR-Central Marine Fisheries Research Institute here has made a major breakthrough by undertaking mass scale seed production of Indian pompano for the first time in the world.

    Indian pompano (trachinotus mookalee) is a marine fish belonging to the family Carangidae. It is low in landing from the wild. It contains Omega 3 and 6 fatty acids. It is sold in the domestic market at ₹200 to ₹300 per kg.

    The species is distributed in the Indo-West Pacific region and present in 15 countries of the Asian continent. In India, it is reported from both the west and east coasts.

    It has sporadic occurrences in bays and lagoons, and the adult fish prefers shallow coastal waters with rocky areas.

    Senior scientist in charge of the regional centre Subhadeep Ghosh told The Hindu that the fish was considered to be a good candidate species for aquaculture due to its fast growth rate, easy adaptability to culture conditions, quick acceptance of artificial feed, pleasant appearance, good meat quality, and high consumer preference. In addition, it can be successfully cultured in tanks, ponds and cages.

    Broodstock collection

    In a bid to diversify Indian mariculture, breeding and seed production of the species was initiated at the regional centre with broodstock collection in 2011.

    Initial success in seed production on a small scale was achieved in early 2014. However, seed could not be produced consistently due to loss of broodstock maintained in the cage by the effect of the catastrophic Hudhud cyclone that hit the Visakhapatnam coast that year.

    Broodstock collection was initiated again in 2015 and the fishes were stocked in the land-based Re-circulating Aquaculture System (RAS) for development and maturation.

    “With manipulation of water quality and feeding protocols, fishes were induced to spawn in the RAS and mass scale seed production was achieved in early 2017,” Dr. Ghosh said.

    Metamorphosis from larvae to fry started on the 17th day post-hatch and was completed by the 22nd day. After 30 days of rearing, the survival rate was around 17.2% and the fry reached an average size of 2.9 cm in length and 1.27 gm in weight. A few thousand fry were transferred to the Veraval Regional Centre of CMFRI in Gujarat and are being nursery-reared for stocking in cages.

    Another few thousand fry were transferred to Nagayalanka in Krishna district of Andhra Pradesh and are being nursed prior to release in the pond. The remaining fry, again a few thousands, are being nursery-reared at the Visakhapatnam Regional Centre of CMFRI.

    He said the seed would be stocked in open sea floating cages for grow-out very soon.

    This was the first case of successful mass scale seed production of Indian pompano under confinement anywhere in the world.

    The success raised hopes for culture of the fish using hatchery produced seed in India and will present enormous scope for aquaculture business opportunity in the near future for Indian fish farmers through species diversification.

    source: http://www.thehindu.com / The Hindu / Home> News> Cities> Visakhapatnam / by Santosh Patnaik / Visakhapatnam – July 04th, 2017

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    Visakhapatnam:

    City girl Sharanya Mudundi was crowned the ‘Little Miss Grand Sea Intercontinental’ at Grand Sea Universe-2017 held in Sofia, Bulgaria, recently. Adding feathers to her cap, she also won the titles ‘Little Miss Grand Sea Asia-2017’, ‘Miss Popularity’ and ‘Best Interview’ at the fashion pageant .

    Nine-year-old Sharanya represented India and competed with children from 30 countries. She also won the title ‘Little Model Earth India-2017’ and ‘Grand Prix Winner Model-2017’ at an international children’s pageant ‘Little Model Earth’ held at Johannesburg, South Africa, in March this year.

    Speaking to TOI, Sharanya said, “I was on cloud nine after I won the titles at Sofia. Although it was a challenging task, bagging these has boosted my confidence. The theme being ‘Beauty for a purpose’, there were different rounds during the contest including interview round, national costume round, talent round and evening gown round. I also showcased our rich Indian culture and traditions. I performed yoga in the talent round and it was one of my memorable experience at the global fashion stage.”

    Daughter of MSN Raju and M Swati, Sharanya is a Class-V student in Delhi Public School. Balancing both academics and fashion shows, she said that it is the support of her parents coupled with time management that helps her to focus on both.

    National Director of India Valentina Mishra, who hails from the city, said, “She is the only Indian girl child to represent India on the global map and to win at an international pageant twice this year.” Valentina was awarded the winner of best director of the year by MMSEA BG, an international agency.

    source: http://www.timesofindia.indiatimes.com / The Times of India / News> City News> Visakhapatnam News / TNN / July 08th, 2017

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    A file picture of the TU 142 aircraft. | Photo Credit: C_V_Subrahmanyam

    A file picture of the TU 142 aircraft. | Photo Credit: C_V_Subrahmanyam

    ‘Transporting disassembled parts of TU 142 to the site will be completed by weekend’

    Work on assembling the decommissioned TU 142 fighter aircraft to convert it into a museum is expected to begin soon at the site earmarked for it on the Beach Road, to inaugurate it by August 15.

    The inauguration was planned to coincide with the official Independence Day function of the state government proposed in the city.

    However, the Independence Day function is now being planned elsewhere, and the TU 142 inauguration is likely to take place ahead of it, it is learnt.

    Retired aircraft engineers and other personnel worked for nearly four weeks at the naval airbase, INS Dega, disassembling the aircraft. An internationally reputed agency had been awarded the work on the aircraft museum. The disassembling itself was said to have cost ₹3.5 crore.

    The aircraft, after its decommissioning, flew to Visakhapatnam after the Andhra Pradesh Government evinced interest in converting it into a museum. Chief Minister N. Chandrababu Naidu received it at a special function from the Naval authorities.

    “Only formal inauguration will take place and the remaining work will continue,” VUDA vice-chairman P. Basanth Kumar told The Hindu.

    “Transporting the disassembled parts to the site will be completed by this week-end after which assembling them will be taken up,” Mr. Basant Kumar said.

    After the formal inauguration, it would take another two to three months to complete the work.

    Escalator and aerobridge

    “We are planning to set up an escalator and an aerobridge for entry of visitors to the aircraft as it would be difficult to climb up to the elevation, and exit by a staircase,” he said.

    All the spares of TU 145 such as propellers and wings would be put on exhibition with an audio-visual show explaining it, he said.

    A souvenir shop, coffee shop, and video games would also be opened outside the aircraft.

    The museum is being set up by the Tourism Department at an estimated cost of ₹10 crore. VUDA has been assigned the supervising responsibilities.

    source: http://www.thehindu.com / The Hindu / Home> News> Cities> Visakhapatnam / by G.V. Prasada Sarma / Visakhapatnam – July 12th, 2017

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    June 18th, 2017adminRecords, All, Sports, World Opinion

    KidambiSrikanthTELAN18jun2017

    Highlights

    1. Srikanth looked in the zone as he easily downed world no 47 Sakai in straight games 21-11, 21-19

    2. The Indonesian Open is Srikanth’s second Super Series Premier title after he won the 2014 China Open Super Series Premier

    3. Srikanth had finished runner-up at Singapore Open after losing to compatriot B Sai Praneeth in the summit clash last month

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    Jakarta :

    Indian shuttler Kidambi Srikanth clinched his third Super Series title, lifting the Indonesia Open men’s singles trophy with a straight-game victory over Japanese qualifier Kazumasa Sakai in the final on Sunday.

    World No.22 Srikanth, who had reached the finals at Singapore Open in April, outclassed Sakai, ranked 47th, 21-11 21-19 in just 37 minutes to take home a cheque of $75,000.

    “He was playing well, especially in the second game and I think for me coming back from 6-11 down and make it 13-13 was the turning point,” said Srikanth, who had clinched the 2014 China Super Series Premier and 2015 India Super Series.

    “My coach will have a special place in my heart as after he came, I reached the finals at Singapore and to win this tournament, which is considered the biggest tournament. I want to thank all the fans who have been rooting for me all this week,” he added.

    Srikanth played a patient game and didn’t allow his opponent to engage in any fast-paced rally. He dictated the pace with his precise angled returns and unleashed his smashes at perfect intervals to down his rival.

    Playing in tricky conditions, Srikanth took time to gauge the conditions as his initial returns went wide and out.

    But his rival also suffered because of similar unforced errors and the Indian led 6-4 early on. He consolidated his lead to reach 11-8 at the break.

    After the interval, Srikanth continued to dominate the proceedings. His net dribbles were better than Sakai and with Sakai struggling with precision, the Indian zoomed to a 19-11 lead and sealed it with two lucky net chord points.

    After the change of sides, Sakai was more aggressive in his approach and produced an improved net game to dominate the rallies.
    Soon, the Japanese was leading 7-3 as he entered the break with an 11-6 lead with the help of a backhand return near the net.

    After the interval, Srikanth’s aggressive game gave him the desired results. He turned the tables and caught up with the Japanese at 13-13 with an on-rushing smash at the net.
    The duo moved neck and neck after that till 19-19 before Srikanth produced two fantastic smashes to seal the deal.

    source: http://www.timesofindia.indiatimes.com / The Times of India / News> Sports> Badminton / PTI / June 18th, 2017

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    C. Narayana Reddy won the Jnanpith award in 1988. | Photo Credit: Nagara Gopal

    C. Narayana Reddy won the Jnanpith award in 1988. | Photo Credit: Nagara Gopal

    CiNaRe was known for his use of Telugu in its pure form, and would not be swayed by filmmakers on the use of the language.

    Eminent poet, litterateur and Jnanpith awardee C. Narayana Reddy, popularly known as CiNaRe, passed away in the early hours of Monday, aged 85. He was taken to a hospital following health complications and was declared dead.

    CiNaRe, born on July 29, 1931 in Hanumajipet of erstwhile Karimnagar district, studied till his graduation in Urdu because Telugu as a medium was not available during the Nizam’s rule. However, because of his intense love for the language he taught himself Telugu and it was only during his degree that he took the option of Telugu as a paper. CiNaRe went on to do a post-graduate degree and a Ph.D on ‘Modern Traditions of Telugu’.

    It was the late N.T. Rama Rao, who wielded the megaphone in film Gulebakavali, who gave CiNaRe his break as a lyricist. He wrote all the songs in the film, including the hit ‘Nannu dochukunnavate .. Vannela Dorasani.’

    CiNaRe was known for his use of Telugu in its pure form, and would not be swayed by filmmakers on the use of the language.

    He was awarded the Padma Shri in 1977 and the Padma Bhushan in 1992. His compilation of poems, titled ‘Viswambhara’, got him the Jnanpith award in 1988. In 1997, he was nominated as a Member of the Rajya Sabha. His academic distinctions include serving as a professor of Osmania University and as Vice Chancellor of the Telugu University.

    Former Governor K. Rosaiah pays homage to C Narayana Reddy in Hyderabad.   | Photo Credit: K.V.S Giri

    Former Governor K. Rosaiah pays homage to C Narayana Reddy in Hyderabad. | Photo Credit: K.V.S Giri

    Among those who condoled with the death of CiNaRe were Governor of Maharashtra and Tamil Nadu, Ch. Vidyasagar Rao and Chief Minister of Telangana, K. Chandrasekhar Rao. Those who visited the family residence and paid their respects included former Governor of Tamil Nadu, K. Rosaiah, Ministers K.T. Rama Rao, G. Jagadheeshwar and actor Venkatesh.

    His last rites will be performed on Wednesday.

    source: http://www.thehindu.com / The Hindu / Home> Books> Authors / by Suresh Krishnamoorthy / Hyderabad – June 12th, 2017

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    Visakhapatnam :

    At just 26 years of age, Vizagite Durugadda Harsha Vardhan has won the Rio Tinto Sculpture Award at the ‘Sculpture by the Sea-2017’ contest recently held in Australia. His work ‘Column of Sound’ has emerged as winner among works by 78 international sculptors and is now being showcased in Perth.

    Harsha’s creation ‘Column of Sound’ consists of two mild steel hemispheres and slices of marble (8 ft by 4 ft dimension) stacked in between. It is based on the visual dynamics of an audio wave where sound translates to tangible and eternal, rendering a paradigm shift of sensory experience. In Harsha’s words, “It’s a translation of sound into a visual form, in the same way we store images as memories, it’s actually my memory of a sound.”

    He was a student of St Francis School and Bullaya College in Vizag following which Harsha completed his B.Sc from Hyderabad and Masters in Visual Communication from Delhi. He also completed a course in arts and aesthetics from JNU. Eventually, he took up sculpting which has also been the profession of his father and grandfather.

    Harsha plans to participate in the next ‘Sculpture by the Sea’ contest to be held at Bondi in Sydney in October. Speaking about his next sculpture, he said, “Made with corten steel, it would be called ‘Fish Love’. This structure will showcase misinterpretation of love. Though, love is always talked about in great terms, it’s often self-gratification rather than a selfless emotion. True love should be always giving without thinking about the self.”

    “Vizag is blessed with the sea, which is a soother and contests and exhibitions by the sea can be held just like in Australia. But we need to create that environment and not ruin art by politicising the events. We need an organising committee for it with encouragement from well-to-do private patrons just like it’s in Australia. Vizag needs more galleries and more events as well as private patrons,” Harsha said.

    source: http://www.timesofindia.indiatimes.com / The Times of India / News> City News> Visakhapatnam News / by Sulogna Mehta / TNN / May 11th, 2017

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    May 7th, 2017adminRecords, All, Science & Technology

    Visakhapatnam :

    King George Hospital (KGH) is soon going to start an emergency medicine department  (EMD), the first among the government hospitals in the state. It would help bring down mortality in trauma and accident cases by speeding up treatment .

    In this regard, a meeting was also held in KGH-AMC this week. Plans are on to house EMD in the new casualty building, which is nearing completion. It’s likely to start functioning in July or August.

    The EMD would have different specialists working together under one roof headed by a general physician or intensivist. It should also have an anaesthetist, orthopaedic doctor, a neurosurgeon, a general surgeon, a plastic surgeon, pulmonary medicine specialist and cardio-thorasic surgeon acting as one unit.

    They would be all trained in advanced life support (ALS). There would also be ALS trained personnel and paramedics to stabilise the patients on the spot of accident before taking the patient to the nearest hospital. This unit of specialists can take maximum care in minimum time lapse so as to prevent deaths due to loss of time.

    Usually victims of poisoning, drowning, animal and reptile bites, burns, road accidents, heart attacks, gunshots or weapon wounds, victims of natural calamities all come under emergency and would be treated in the EMD, say doctors.

    For the upcoming EMD, doctors from Amcana (Andhra Medical College Alumni of North America) would also come forward to help with software and technical support by helping to set up an electronic medical records system and by training doctors, medical officers, nurses and paramedics on EMD protocols. They can also help with the equipment as and when required, pointed out AMC principal Dr P V Sudhakar.

    source: http://www.timesofindia.indiatimes.com / The Times of India / News> City News> Visakhapatnam News / by Sulogna Mehta / TNN / May 03rd, 2017

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